Drucquer & Sons Tinned Pipe Tobaccos

+About Drucquer & Sons
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Drucquer & Sons is a name with a long, long history, stretching back to 1841. But our main concern is not the brand's legacy, but what came later... much later. Even long after John Drucquer III relocated from London to Berkeley, California in 1928. Our main concern is around the time a young Greg Pease first stepped in D&S's door, and a very special thing happened: he was welcomed. What's more, he continued to be welcome. In fact, he was so welcomed he ended up working there, the master blender we know today starting out as a humble mixer of the D&S house signature blends: the same blends featured below.

It was this welcoming gesture that gave Greg his beginnings. It was by the "gang" that held sway over D&S's inner sanctum, the backroom, that Pease was not introduced to pipes, but to finer pipes, and not introduced to pipe tobacco, but the finer things pipe tobacco could be. If it hadn't been for those older fellows, wise in pipe ways and willing to share without ever making Greg feel like he was just the kid, the neophyte... well the G.L. Pease we know today very probably would have never come about. Greg once wrote: "...a dangerous lot of scals if ever there was one. We were armed; we had pipes, and knew how to use them." And also: "I owe those men a lot."

One good turn deserves another, and that's why the Drucquer & Sons blends are still alive today, though the Drucquer shop itself has long been a memory. Greg kept them that way.